Friday Fuel: Communion Germs, Smoking Jesus and Atheists to the Rescue

November 1, 2013

Happy November 1, or All Saints Day, if you are observant of such things.

So for the last few years, my wife and I have flipped on our porch light and waited with a big bowl of candy for our neighborhood kids.  I know there’s a lot of them because the school bus stop is right on our corner.  But we never get more than a handful of kids, so we end up giving them fistfulls of Twix bars (while keeping plenty back for ourselves.)  Last night we tried “reverse trick-or-treating.”  We went out to find the kids ourselves, handing out candy to any lucky passers-by.  Pretty fun.

Anyway, I was struck this week by both the quality and quantity of great blog stuff that happened this week.

Friendly Atheists

You and I know we don’t have to wait too long to be appalled by the behavior of some Christians.  But there was a story this week that kind of turned the tables.  A pastor was attacked by a militant atheist, leaving him with a fractured nose.

I suppose there are atheists out there who can be just as embarrassed by the bad apples in their barrel because “The Friendly Atheist,” Hemant Mehta has stepped up to raise money for the preacher’s medical bills.

Maybe we can let that be a reminder to the rest of us.  Before we divide ourselves between Christian and Atheist, let’s remember that we are all human first.

Communion Germs

My family dabbled in the Episcopal church for a couple of years before the hurdle of the germs on the shared communion chalice became to great for certain members of the family.  That little personal history made Micha Boyett’s take on the metaphor of communion a little more special for me, even though she speaks as a pregnant woman (something I will never be).

Jesus in the Smoking Section

I’ve featured Erika Morrison here before, who writes at The Life Artist.  She’s been on hiatus for a few months, and it was good to see her back at her blog, and I need to further reason to place her on my list.

Strange Fire

Like I’ve said before, I’m not a Charismatic.  To me, the issue of speaking in tongues (or not) is not something to divide over.  But Mary DeMuth has made the most eloquent argument for unity over an issue that has suddenly become much more divisive than it ought to be.

Any Last Words?

Finally, it’s especially appropriate after a day celebrating fear (and lots of references to death).  Funeral director / blogger Caleb Wilde featured an excellent guest writer on the nature of how we might die, based on our personalities.  For something that no one likes to think about, it’s really good stuff that we ought to think about: This is How We Die: A Morning with a Hospice Nurse.

That’s what fueled me this week.  What about you?

4 responses to Friday Fuel: Communion Germs, Smoking Jesus and Atheists to the Rescue

  1. That’s what I did, also. Took my bowl of candy and walked around my neighborhood and handed it all out.

    All the while listening to this great message (I listened to it twice with my ipone and earbuds in:

    http://theoldadam.com/2013/11/01/this-sermon-epitomizes-the-work-that-came-out-of-the-reformation/

    It kept me going!
    theoldadam recently posted..This sermon epitomizes the work that came out of the Reformation…

  2. hey, thanks for featuring micha’s piece! (you can totally still “dip” your wafer in the wine at episcopal churches. it’s called intinction–no germ sharing required:)
    suzannah recently posted..all you his saints

  3. Dipping your wafer is totally legal and possibly more sanitary as long as you’re not getting your fingers all over everything. If you’re really skeeved out, though, you can cross your arms over your chest and the priest will say a blessing over you instead. My husband has taken to doing this because he really likes the prayer our priest uses (it’s the same one he uses for children that are too young to receive–“May St. Mary pray for you and may God’s holy angels guard, protect, and defend you.” Maybe it’s weird, but I always loved the notion of the “holy angels” protecting the kids.)